Archives for April 2017

Navigating Organizational Change? We’ve Got Your Answers

to do and not to do

What to consider before you get started, overcoming obstacles, fighting fires, spreading the message and even knowing when it’s time to go…along with a few laughs.

Start Here:

How to Tell the Team and your Customers:

UGLY Conversations

Prioritizing:

Ruts, Stalls and Backlash:

Shifting Gears:

Lean Startup Techniques in Organizational Change:

Taking Care of YOU

Side Notes

book by Jeanne Goldie

Speed Read an Organization with our Easy Guide

Have you grabbed your Free copy of our Guide to Speed Reading the Corporate Landscape? Get a Copy of Reading the Terrain by entering your email in the box. It will help you “see” a new company more quickly and may even help you spot things you’ve missed in places where you’ve worked for years.  

 

 

One of these things is not like the others…and confirmation bias will make sure it doesn’t get the job.

confirmation bias part two

According to the HBR, when you only have one non-traditional candidate in your hiring pool, that candidate has zero statistical chance of being hired.

Confirmation Bias Strikes Again.

When a business stalls or encounters serious problems, it is often the very “team” that gave it strength that now is part of the roadblock to creating innovative solutions.  Most businesses tend to hire employees from very similar backgrounds, whether socio-economic, schooling, or even geography.  It can narrow their perspective and also create an effect where there is deadly “group think.”  This is usually thought to be a result of the players being so “comfortable” with each other that they don’t challenge each other’s assumptions, and tend to draw the same conclusions. (Real-life examples of the type of “group think” turnaround featured in the classic “Twelve Angry Men” are rarer than we’d like to believe.)

A recent study published in the Harvard Business Review points out an even more insidious barrier to change, even among those companies that may be trying to diversify their teams.  It’s a long, but fascinating read….and you better have at least two people with a different perspective if you want to turn that jury around.

If there’s only one woman (or ethnically diverse or non-college educated or under-represented “fill in the blank here” candidate) in your candidate pool, there’s statistically almost no chance she’ll be hiredRead it here. The good news? Adding just one other non-traditional  candidate radically increases the statistical probability that a non-traditional candidate will be hired.

We’ve talked about how confirmation bias can limit your ability to correctly identify your problems here and why project teams need diverse viewpoints. Need to see just how homogenous your team is? Grab our “Reading the Terrain” field guide here. The pointed questions will help you view a very familiar place with fresh eyes.

© Jeanne Goldie 2015